Mine Damage

Mine Not Damaged
The ill-fated mine, investigation shows, was very little damaged by the terrific explosion.  In fact, it was stated, Wednesday morning, that it was then in shape to produce coal.  The electrical wiring for signals and lights was put out of commission, between the 15th and 17th  level, but this as well as the wrecked trip was repaired in a few hours.  The pumps were not damaged.  Robert Miller, electrical expert, of Sale Lake, made a complete investigation of all electrical equipment Wednesday and gave the  mine his okay.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.


Pumps Continuously
After rescue work was abandoned for a few hours after midnight Tuesday, only four pumpmen remained in the mine.  The pumps were not damaged by the explosion.  No. 1 mine is badly waterlogged in the lower depths, and three massive pumps with a combined capacity of over 4000 gallons a minute are kept working nearly all the time.  Had the pumps been put out of commission, the mine would no doubt have been destroyed.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 17 August 1923, page 2.
Most Deadly Gas
White damp, most rare in mines developed after Tuesday's explosion, according to members of the Cumberland rescue crew, and which was almost overcome at one time.  Black damp, a few breaths of which is fatal, develops after all explosions, but white damp far more deadly is rare.  Throughout the day and night of rescue, the men were threatened with gases, and only helmeted rescuers were allowed to go into the more dangerous places.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.