Newspaper Snippets

Families
Daughter Overcome
Another Frontier family saddened by the explosion of Tuesday was that of John Sager, father and son., Sr. and Jr., were among the victims leaving the mother and two sisters.  Miss Sophia, a daughter, who is postal clerk at the Frontier post office, was so overcome with grief that fears were felt for her recovery Wednesday.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.

Widow Left Alone
Another sad incident connected with the explosion is that of Mrs. Matt Erickson, who lost her husband and son, her only living relatives in America.  The bereaved widow was prostrated with grief, and no sadder spectacle ever was witnessed than that depicted when the sheets were lifted from the faces of her husband and son, lying in the morgue.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.

Broke Quarantine
When news of the explosion was flashed in Frontier, everyone ran to the mouth of the mine and excitement reigned.  Members of the family of Joe Nagi, under quarantine for scarlet fever, broke quarantine and Mrs. Nagi was at the mouth of the mine when her husband was rescued alive.  Fear is felt that the dread disease may have been spread, and local physicians are awaiting the outcome, ready to establish rigid quarantine at once.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.

First Day At Work
No family in Frontier was more sadly smitten by the explosion than that of Andrew Lupcho, who lost his life along with his two sons, George and Joe.  Joe had been off duty for two weeks suffering from an injured knee, sustained in the mine, and had just been released the morning of the accident when he was killed.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.

Fatherless Infants
Many infants have been left fatherless by the mine holocaust of Tuesday, and to the arrival of one infant is due the life of one miner, John Roitz, was saved.  Roitz is a driver, and was assigned to the ill-fated 27th entry for Tuesday, but expecting an arrival in his family, he laid off.  His babe was born at the L.C.M. (Lincoln County Memorial) hospital in the afternoon.  His team was killed in the mine.

Saddened on a bed of pain, lies Mrs. Mike Citerio, with her little son, born two days before the father was killed.    It was their first son, two daughters preceded, and the father, overjoyed, had planned a celebration for next Sunday, to which a score or more of his friends, many who were killed with him, were invited to attend.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.

Seven Fatherless Homes
Scarcely a home in Frontier Tuesday that wasn't bereft of a loved one.  At one place there were seven cabins in a row, where the husbands and fathers had left Tuesday morning, never to return.  A pall of gloom settled over this row, as women, hysterical with grief, and little children stood by in wonderment.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, Friday, August 17, 1923.

Lost Husband and Father
 Mrs. Marion Pernice,  a 17-year-old wife with one child, and who is now in a delicate condition in expectation of the second, was sadly bereaved by the explosion.  Her husband, father, cousin and uncle were killed.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, Friday, August 17, 1923.

Happy Reunion Brought to Close by the Disaster
(Louisville, Ky., Herald.)
The Arm of tragedy reached from a mine disaster in Wyoming yesterday to a home in Louisville to cast sorrow over a family and end a happy vacation trip and reunion in bitter grief.

Saturday Misses Ida and Clara Essman, Kemmerer, Wyo., and their brother Clarence, of Montpelier, Ida., arrived in Louisville to visit their uncle, Mr. William Drislane, at 2428 Ransdell avenue.  They had made the long journey with the happiest anticipations.

Tuesday evening, they received a telegram that their brother, George Essman, had lost his life in the mine disaster at Kemmerer.  He was the rope splicer at the ill-fated Frontier mine No. 1.  The telegram stated that he was one of the last to enter the mine, and is believed to have been one of the first to perish.

The Misses Essman and their brother left last night on the Pan-American for Cincinnati in order to make connection for home as quickly as possible.  It will be two days before they arrive.  The three were overcome by grief when the news was received yesterday afternoon just as they returned from a drive.  They had planned to visit also the family of their aunt, Mrs. W.P. Lee, 1703 Edenside, wife of the local manager of the  Remington Typewriter company.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 24 August 1923, page 5.

Pavlizon Not in Mental Hospital
 A number of newspapers afar contained a story last Sunday that John Pavlizon, one of the miners rescued from the ill-fated No. 1 Frontier mine last week, had been taken to the State Mental hospital at Evanston, insane from experiences.
This is an error, as Pavlizon is still here.  The dispatch was dated Evanston, the location of the mental hospital, but there has been a misunderstanding somewhere.  Pavlizon is one of the miners of the 29th entry, who worked heroically for hours barricading themselves from the poisonous gases following the explosion, and who underwent a thousand deaths during the terror that followed the blast.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 24 August 1923, page 5.

Other Related Stories
Three Miners Ejected
The only story of heartlessness following the explosion is that of three youth, all UMW of A (United Mine Workers of America) men, who were induced to come to Colorado from a far-away coal field, but when they found non-union mines in Colorado, they proceeded here, landing without a cent.  They entered the mine for the first time Tuesday morning, and (had) just been assigned to their places when the explosion occurred.  They were among the rescued, after a period of 8 hours of torture.  At their boarding house yesterday they were told, when they started  they had no money , that they must leave, as the landlord wanted miners in the house that were working.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, Friday, August 17, 1923.


Large News Staff
As in every great catastrophe, the various news agencies at once sent men to cover the news of the tragedy, and it took three extra telegraph operators at the telegraph office to handle the voluminous messages.  Operators Staff of Pocatello, Rollins of Rock Springs, and Hamilton of the Associated Press were on duty almost continuously, as well as the manager, Mrs. Elmer Young.  The International News, United and Associated staff men were among the correspondents on the ground from the outside.  All had left town last evening.
Source:
Kemmerer Republican, Friday, 17 August 1923, page 2.
$200 Fine and Ten Days for Fountain
While District Judge Arnold was in Kemmerer this week passing upon workman's compensation matters, Ray Fountain, arrested several weeks ago, charged with having in his possession a still, indicated his desire for a hearing and upon entering court pleaded guilty and asked for mercy.  Judge Arnold imposed a sentence of 10 days in the county jail and a fine of $200.


Fountain was arrested while transporting a still from sublet to some point along Hamsfork.  He was arrested by H.E. Mosteller, state prohibition agent.


Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 17 August 1923, page 1.