Condolences

Pioneer Miner
J.T. Bird, Sr. one of the substantial business men and property owners of Evanston, came to Kemmerer Wednesday following his receipt of news of the explosion.  Mr. Bird was very much interested, having spent 50 years of his life working in the mines, in most all positions, and for a time served as state mine inspector.  Mr. Bird was present at the Almy mine explosion, which killed over 90 in 1905.  Like everyone else Mr. Bird's heart went out to the bereaved of Kemmerer and Frontier.  He returned to Evanston yesterday.  
Source:
The Wyoming Press, 25 August, 1923, page 1.


Union S. & Loan Assn. to Refund Money
A letter was received this morning from C.L. Agnew, secretary of the Union Savings & Loan Association of Rock Springs, asking for official list of the names of the dead in Tuesday's calamity.

He reported also:  "Our directors have met and passed  a resolution to lay aside our rules of withdrawal and every cent collected will be returned to the families in need and who wish to discontinue the policy.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 17 August 1923, page 2.
 
 This is What Counts
The Preston Milling Co. has sent a check for $25, with a lengthy letter of sympathy for the families of the Frontier mine disaster.  The money has been turned over to the local chapter of the Red Cross.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 17 August 1923, page 1.

Italian Consul Arrived
F. Anselmo, Italian consul for Utah and Wyoming, with headquarters in Salt Lake, arrived in the city yesterday morning for the purpose of assisting any of his countrymen in need; also to get details and confer with company officials for a report he will submit to the Italian government.  He will take part in the funeral today.  Consul Anselmo asks that he wants to meet all of his countrymen while here, especially the stricken families of the miners.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 17 August 1923, page 2.


Officials Left
Messrs. Fox, Morgan, Cahill and Young, prominent Labor Union officials, after doing everything in their power to assist following the explosion, have left the city, Fox and Morgan leaving Saturday after the last funeral, Cahill Monday evening and Young Tuesday evening.  The presence of the popular officials, and their devotion to the general cause stimulated everyone to greater endeavor.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 24 August 1923, page 1.

Kemmerer Arrived
John S. Kemmerer, one of the owners of the Kemmerer Coal Co., with headquarters in New York, arrived here the latter part of the week to render whatever assistance he could following the accident.  In company with P.J. Quealy, they departed for the east Wednesday evening of this week.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 24 August 1923, page 1.
Japanese Editor
II Yokoyama, editor of the "Rocky Mountain Times," a Japanese newspaper published at Salt Lake city, was a visitor in Kemmerer last week, checking up on the deaths of his countrymen following the explosion of No. 1 mine.  The visiting scribe was a welcome caller at the Republican office.
Source:
The Kemmerer Republican, 24 August 1923, page 1.

The Kemmerer Camera, management and employes (sic), extends heart felt sympathy to all those whose loved ones have paid the supreme sacrifice.  May the Great Father be with you in your hour of sorrow.
Source:
The Kemmerer Camera, 17 August 1923, page 1.

Condolence from Ireland 
The Camera is in receipt of a cable from Archdeacon Dray at Dunsfold, Ireland. 
Source:
The Kemmerer Camera, 17 August 1923, page 1.